Some Observations on US Political Debates

Romney versus Obama, Wednesday, 03 October 2012 “The second topic, which is you said you get a deduction for taking a plant overseas. Look, I’ve been in business for 25 years. (Unlike you who have no real work experience.) I have no idea what you’re talking about. (And neither do you, I would add.)”—Governor Romney (Subtext added.) The President, who was so arrogant as to assume he need not prepare properly for this debate was unpleasantly surprised. Ryan versus Biden, Thursday, 11 October 2012 A win for Ryan was unacceptable to the Democrats; there was too much downside following the … Continue reading Some Observations on US Political Debates

Vision and Truth

President Barack Obama made his case for a second term last night in Charlotte. Today, opinions vary about its impact, from—commentators are using baseball analogies—a grand slam hit to a swing and a miss. This is hardly surprising in the context of partisan interpretations. However, it is also not surprising that opinions would vary about Barack Obama and anything he says, or does. It is his stock and trade to say one thing and mean another, not unlike most politicians who will utter almost anything it will take to get elected or re-elected. Nothing new there either; politicians lie. A … Continue reading Vision and Truth

Crude, Aristocratic and Mean

The president of the United States holds a dim view of humanity. It is crude, aristocratic and mean. This was revealed in his famous “you didn’t build that” speech. First, despite the media reprieve afforded him—first by the Colorado movie theatre massacre, and now by Olympic sports coverage—Barack Obama’s alleged gaffe is still news. While Obama’s defenders argue he was quoted out of context, Charles Krauthammer and Philip Klein have both noted that quoting more from Obama actually makes matters worse. Mr. Krauthammer suggests that Obama’s comments could be so damaging to his re-election campaign that opposition Republicans should replay … Continue reading Crude, Aristocratic and Mean

The Turmoil of Being Turmel

  Nycole Turmel is the acting leader of the Canadian New Democratic Party (NDP), relieving Jack Layton who recently stepped down to deal with personal health priorities. It did not take long for the neophyte leader of the official opposition in the House of Commons to get into trouble. Nycole From “The Bloc” Nycole Turmel has come under widespread criticism in light of the revelation that she was once a card-carrying member of the Bloc Québécois, a Quebec nationalist federal party on the left wing of the commonly-used political spectrum. “The Bloc”, as it is referred to in most of … Continue reading The Turmoil of Being Turmel

The Right Food

Did you know that the United Nations employs a position entitled, “The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food”? I did not know it either. Prof. Olivier De Schutter holds that position and his job is to compile reports for the governing body. That is what a Rapporteur does routinely. Prof. Olivier De Schutter has denounced, according to an Agence France-Presse article appearing in the National Post online, a current UN report which supports the Israeli commando raid on a Turkish “aid flotilla” in May of last year. The “Gaza Freedom Flotilla” was bent on breaking the Gaza … Continue reading The Right Food

On Government and Other Looters

On March 23 an opposition non-confidence motion was passed by a margin of 11 votes in the Canadian House of Commons. Parliament was subsequently dissolved and another Canadian election will be held on May 2. On April 4, US President Barack Obama announced his intention to seek re-election in November 2012. Meanwhile, gridlock in the US Congress over negotiations to cut government spending threatens shutdown of the US government. In June of last year, the New Flemish Alliance, a Dutch separatist party emerged as the largest following elections in Belgium. The various political parties could not form a governing coalition … Continue reading On Government and Other Looters

What’s the Big Idea?

The most significant development of 2010 was a life-affirming idea demonstrating the concept of spontaneous order and implying the cardinal virtue of independence of the individual. One frustrated individual, Rick Santelli, ranted on-air at CNBC on February 19, 2009 about certain oppressive interventionist actions of government and called for a new Tea Party. Some credit this rant as the start of the movement. Whether Mr. Santelli was the catalyst or not doesn’t matter. Despite broad media and political efforts to trivialize the phenomenon, Tea Partiers collected support across party lines, social classes and cultural subgroups. The influence of the Tea … Continue reading What’s the Big Idea?

Turbulent Waters Ahead

American voters will soon participate in a drill to rearrange the deck chairs on their titanic ship of State. Election Day is November 2, 2010. Many are caught up in the idea that a new crew with better ideas will help navigate through rough seas. However, few have recognized the looming economic iceberg of unintended consequences, the unavoidable cumulative result of a drift toward greater command and control by both captain and crew—those past and present. Fundamentally nothing changes in the corporatist managed economy of the United States, including the growing scope of government involvement in the daily affairs of … Continue reading Turbulent Waters Ahead

‘Cane in a Cave

What should have been—in a rational culture—little more than a storm in a teacup, has unfortunately morphed from an insignificant symbolic gesture to an event possibly requiring tactical changes in the so-called War on Terror. Pastor Terry Jones of the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Florida wants to mark the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 act of war by Islamic jihadists by burning a few hundred copies of the jihadists’ military manual—the Koran. Stormy events emanating from Florida usually involve natural hurricanes or at least tropical storms, but the Cable News Network (CNN) and the rest of the … Continue reading ‘Cane in a Cave

“Race” for the Primitive

Imagine that you’ve met the love of your life; you’ve begun cohabitation or even married and settled into your lover’s home within the local community. One day there is the equivalent of a knock at the door of your love nest and an unexpected letter arrives. It is addressed only to you, not your partner. As you read the letter you come to understand it is an eviction notice, concluding with the statement, “We trust that you understand the seriousness of this letter and will govern yourself accordingly.” You have been given ten days to pack up and leave or … Continue reading “Race” for the Primitive